Using Twitter for the wrong reasons

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Check out the tag lineI just read about the Twitter plans of DiGiorno Pizza in the US. It’s a perfect example of getting over-excited about social media and putting the technology before the strategy.

Here’s a brand with the tagline “it’s not delivery, it’s DiGiorno” and yet in order to create some Twitter Buzz they are planning to “deliver” pizza to influential Tweeters.

Is there a better example of fogetting brand values and the brand message for the sake of a quick bit of buzz?

They talk about building engagement, yet if they’re really after online engagment they ought to be thinking about sustainable conversations and relationships. Not one-off Tweetups.

I’m all for trying out Social Media and giving things a go, but this is so clearly off-message that I can’t believe it’s been thought through. It’s stinks of traditional PR/ad agency thinking applied online.

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4 Responses
  • Using Twitter for the wrong reasons « Twitter @ Information-Source-Online.Com
    Apr 9, 2009

    [...] Original post by FreshNetworks Blog [...]

    Using Twitter for the wrong reasons « Twitter @ Information-Source-Online.Com Apr 9, 2009
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  • Apr 10, 2009

    Depending on what their overall mission is, it could actually have been thought through more than you and I would like to believe. If they are after quick hits, a short-lived buzz and getting in front of a few influencers, then they’ve got the perfect strategy.

    Angela Connor Apr 10, 2009
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  • Apr 10, 2009

    Matt, I’d be the first to agree with you on the unsustainability of such an approach to marketing, and communities are clearly a more solid and nuanced foundation from which to build ongoing engagement with customers with value flowing in both directions, but that doesn’t mean there isn’t still a place for campaigns.

    Disposable though they are (and much as you, I or anyone might find them shortsighted or passé), campaigns still have a place in customer acquisition strategies as part of a range of touch points (as the Ad Age piece mentions) with current and potential new customers, especially in the field of mass market consumer purchases where churn is the norm (whether its pizzas or mobile phone contracts) and marketing / acquisition plans are built around that cyclical premise.

    I think the mistake here is not in putting technology before strategy, but in not understanding that social media messaging platforms such as Twitter are better suited as brand monitoring, feedback, engagement and CRM mechanisms. They’ve fallen victim to the shallowest form of media hype – not technological determinism – in thinking that this is they best way to “reach influncers” and pursue “blogger relations”.

    With so many brands and charlatans piling onto to Twitter, it’ll just get harder to stand out from the noise and not get lumped in (and screened out) with all the other spammy activity.

    Having said that, free pizza-fulled tweetups might get some popularity points with high school and college students, scoring them some transient buzz and a foothold in the market.

    But in very little time, even “influencers” in this demographic (if they want to retain their ‘signal’ status) will get more immune to the crass schmoozing tactics of unthinking brands – or demand more compensation. It’s a dead end ultimately.

    Just because Twitter is “hot” and “free” doesn’t mean it is cheap and easy.

    Deirdre Molloy Apr 10, 2009
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  • Apr 10, 2009

    Oops, my mistake Charlie :-)

    Deirdre Molloy Apr 10, 2009
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